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The Apostles' Creed by Ben Myers: Lending Library Book Review


The meaning of history is not power and empire, but promise and trust. The secret of history is revealed when a woman, insignificant to the eyes of the world, responds in joy to God’s promise and bears that promise into the world in her own body. -Ben Myers, The Apostles’ Creed (p. 54)


Of the many quotable passages in Ben Myers’ The Apostles’ Creed, I choose to begin this Lending Library Book Review with this one. And that for two reasons. First, if you don’t like the passage then I’ve saved you the trouble of borrowing the book. Second, the passage exemplifies the breadth of Myers’ vision as he reflects upon and upacks the sections of the Apostles’ Creed. Further along that line, the passage also shows the tender depths of that vision. Both the breadth and the depth, as Myers conveys them, are beautifully informed by the Apostles’ Creed itself.


Slowly reading and savoring this book is an exercise in receiving the ministry of dogma and doctrine. There is such a thing. That’s something I find easy to forget. But this book reminded me that, at their best, dogma and doctrine serve, correct, and heal our inward vision. This is a ministry we need living, as we do, surrounded by many half-truths and more than a few outright lies that are very appealing to our fallen hearts and destructive desires.


Myers provides a gentle yet powerful reminder, from the Apostles’ Creed, that there is such a thing as “meaning.” And that, according to the Scriptures which are summarized in the Apostles’ Creed, human history has one. This scriptural-credal-gospel meaning undoes the ravages of sinful violence, makes faith possible, and glorifies the Father who makes and keeps his promises through the Son and sends the Spirit thereby creating Church.


I look forward to reading this book again and encourage you to borrow my copy and read it, too. Then let’s grab a cup of coffee and talk about it!


Peace,

Fr. Greg+




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